Docker Version Manager (DVM) to easily Move between Docker Client Version

Another break-time post from the continuous tutorial about cloud native applications ūüôā

Sometimes when we are working in container environment, we found server’s version is not the same as client’s version. So we can not connect to the server. To easily solve this issue, we should install dvm (docker version manager) so we can easily move from one environment in our client to another.

These are the steps:

$ curl -sL https://download.getcarina.com/dvm/latest/install.sh | sh

$ source /Users/doddipriyambodo/.dvm/dvm.sh
#Usages of the commands:

$ dvm ls --> see the version in your client
$ dvm ls-remote --> see what version available to install
$ dmv install 1.12.3 --> install the client
$ dvm use 1.12.3 --> use the specified client
$ dvm deactivate --> uninstall the client

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Can Not Connect / Error Connecting to iSCSI SAN

Sorry to disturb the tutorial about cloud native application, just a quick note about the troubleshooting.

I found an issue today regarding my iSCSI connection to the datastore. All hosts are all having this error when trying to connect to the SAN. This is because I played with my Lab a lot! and tried to remove and add the NIC of my Fusion and also my Host.

Error messages looks something like this:

Call "IscsiManager.QueryBoundVnics" for object "iscsiManager" on ESXi / vCenter failed.

The problem is solved with the following:

1. Disabled the iSCSI software adapter (backup your iqn and settings)
2. Navigate to /etc/vmware/vmkiscsid/ of the host and backup the files
3. Delete the contents in /etc/vmware/vmkiscsid/
4. Reboot the host
5. Create a new software iscsi adapter, write the IQN with the old one we backup earlier
6. Add iscsi port bindings and targets.
7. DONE.

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Running your Docker in Production Environment using VMware vSphere Integrated Containers ‚Äď (Part 2)

Following our tutorial, now we will continue to do the installation and configuration for those components.

So, rephrasing previous blog post. By utilising vSphere Integrated Containers, now Developers can use their docker commands to manage the development environments, also functionalities are enriched with specific container management portal (VMware Admiral) and enterprise features container registry (VMware Harbor). System administrator can still use their favourite management tool to manage the infrastructure, such as vCenter and also vRealize Operations plus Log Insight to manage the virtual infrastructure in a whole holistic view. Shown in the diagram below:

A traditional container environment use the host/server to handle several containers. Docker has the ability to import images into the host, but the resource is tied to that host. The challenge is sometime that host has a very limited set of resources. To expand resource on that host, then we need to shutdown the host and then the containers. Then we need to add resource for that physical/virtual machine before more containers can be powered deployed. Another challenge is the container is not portable as it can not be moved to another host since it is very tight to the OS kernel of the container host.

Another concerns other than resources, already explained in my earlier post regarding some enterprise features if we would like to run docker in production environment such as security, manageability, availability, diagnosis and monitoring, high availability, disaster recovery, etc. VIC (vSphere Integrated Containers) can give the solution for all those concerns by using resource pool as the container host and virtual machines as the containers. Plus with new features of vSphere 6 about Instant Clone now VIC¬†can deliver “instant on” container experience alongside the security, portability, and isolation of Virtual Machine. Adding extra hosts in the resource pool to dynamically increase infra resources, initiate live migration/vMotion, auto placement/Distributed Resource Scheduler, dedicated placement/affinity, self healing/High Availability, QoS/weight, quota/limit, guarantee/reservation, etc will add a lot of benefits to the docker environment.

So, these are our steps to prepare the environments for vSphere Integrated Containers (VIC).

  1. Installation and configuration of vSphere Integrated Containers
  2. Installation and configuration of Harbor
  3. Installation and configuration of Admiral

So, let’s start the tutorial now.

Checking the Virtual Infrastructure Environments

  • I am running my virtualisation infrastructure¬†in my¬†Mac laptop using VMware Fusion Professional 8.5.1.
  • Currently I am using vSphere ESXi Enterprise Plus version 6 update 2, and vCenter Standard version 6 update 2.
  • I have NFS storage as my centralised storage, NTP, DNS and DHCP also configured in another VM.

    screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-15-32-42
    screen-shot-2016-11-04-at-15-11-52

Installation of vSphere Integrated Containers (VIC)

There are two approach to install VIC. This is the first one: (I use this to install on my laptop)

  1. Download the installation source from github = https://github.com/vmware/vic
  2. You will download the vic from the pull command using git. First install the git components from here = https://git-scm.com/downloads
  3. Run this command = $ git clone https://github.com/vmware/vicscreen-shot-2016-11-03-at-18-17-01
  4. After downloaded go to the directory = $ cd vic
  5. Now, build the binaries using this command =
    docker run -v $(pwd):/go/src/github.com/vmware/vic -w /go/src/github.com/vmware/vic golang make all
     screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-18-42-34

OR, you can do the second approach: (I use this to install on my VM)

  1. Download binary file from here = https://bintray.com/vmware/vic-repo/build
  2. In this personal lab, I am using this binary = https://bintray.com/vmware/vic-repo/build/6511#files
  3. Download that binary to the Virtual Machine that you will be used for VIC Management Host.
  4. Extract the file using = $¬†tar -zxvf vic_6511.tar.gz. ¬†NOTE:You will see the latest build as shown here. The build number “6511” will be different as this is an active project and new builds are uploaded constantly.

Okay, you already installed the installer now. In those steps above, there are three primary components generated by a full build, found in the ./bin directory by defaul). The make targets used are the following:

  1. vic-machine –¬†make vic-machine
  2. appliance.iso –¬†make appliance
  3. bootstrap.iso –¬†make bootstrap

Okay, after this we will Deploy our Virtual Container Host in VMware environments (I am using vCenter with ESXi as explained earlier). The installation can run on dedicated ESXi host too (without vCenter) if needed.


Now, continue to create the Virtual Container Host in the vCenter. Since I am using Mac, I will use command prompt for mac.

$ ./vic-machine-darwin create --target 172.16.159.150/dc1.lab.bicarait.com --compute-resource cls01.dc01.lab.bicarait.com --user administrator@vsphere.local --password VMware1! --image-store ds_fusion_01 --no-tlsverify --name virtualcontainerhost01 --bridge-network dvPgContainer01 --force

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-21-37-13

After that command above, let’s check the condition of our virtual infrastructure from vCenter now. Currently we will see that we have a new resource pool as the virtual container host, and a vm as an endpoint vm as a target of the container host.

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-21-45-38


Okay, installation is completed. Let’s try to deploy a docker machine into the VIC now.

$ docker -H 172.16.159.153:2376 --tls info

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-22-24-09

After that, let’s do the pull and run command for the docker as normal operation same as my previous posts.
$ docker -H 172.16.159.153:2376 --tls \
--tlscert='./docker-appliance-cert.pem' \
--tlskey='./docker-appliance-key.pem' pull vmwarecna/nginx

$ docker -H 172.16.159.153:2376 --tls \
--tlscert='./docker-appliance-cert.pem' \
--tlskey='./docker-appliance-key.pem' run -d -p 80:80 vmwarecna/nginx

Note: for production, we must use the *.pem key to connect to the environment. Since this is my development environment, so I will skip that.

 

Okay, now finally… this is a video to explain the operational of vSphere Integrated Container, VMware Admiral, and VMware Harbor (I already explained about Admiral and Harbor in my previous blog post in here):

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

 

Running your Docker in Production Environment using VMware vSphere Integrated Containers – (Part 1)

In this tutorial, after explaining about running Docker in my Mac. Now, it’s time to move those dockers on your laptop to production environment. In VMware, we will utilise vSphere ESXi as the production grade virtualisation technology as the foundation of the infrastructure.

In production environment, lot of things need to be considered. From availability, manageability, performance, reliability, scalability, security (AMPRSS). This AMPRSS considerations can be easily achieved by implementing docker container from your development environment (laptop) to the production environment (vSphere ESXi). One of the concern of docker technology is the containers share the same kernel and are therefore less isolated than real VMs. A bug in the kernel affects every container.

vSphere Integrated Containers Engine will allow developers familiar with Docker to develop in containers and deploy them alongside traditional VM-based workloads on vSphere clusters, and allowing for these workloads to be managed through the vSphere UI in a way familiar to existing vSphere admins.

Docker itself is far less capable than actual hypervisor. It doesn’t come with HA, live migration, hardware virtualization security, etc. VIC (VMware Integrated Containers) brings the container paradigm directly to the hypervisor, allowing you to deploy containers as first-class citizens. The net result is that containers inherit all of the benefits of VMs, because they are VMs. The Docker image, once instantiated, becomes a VM inside vSphere. This solves security as well as operational concerns at the same time.

But these are NOT traditional VMs that require for example 2TB and take 2 minutes to boot. These are usually as big as the Docker image itself and take a few seconds to instantiate. They boot from a minimal ISO which contains a stripped-out Linux kernel (based on Photon OS), and the container images and volumes are attached as disks.

The ContainerVMs are provisioned into a ‚ÄúVirtual Container Host‚ÄĚ which is just like a Swarm cluster, but implemented as logical distributed capacity in a vSphere Resource Pool. You don‚Äôt need to add or remove physical nodes to increase or decrease the VCH capacity, you simply re-configure its resource limits and let vSphere clustering and DRS (Distributed Resource Scheduler) handle the details.

The biggest benefit of VIC is that it helps to draw a clear line between the infrastructure provider (IT admin) and the consumer (developer/ops). The consumer wins because they don’t have deal with managing container hosts, patching, configuring, etc. The provider wins because they can leverage the operational model they are already using today (including NSX and VSAN).

Developers will continue to develop dockers and IT admin will keep managing VMs. The best of both worlds.

It also can be combined with other enterprise tool to manage the Enterprise environment, such as vRealize Operations, vRealize Log Insight, Virtual SAN, VMware NSX, vRealize Automations.

In this post, I will utilise these technologies from VMware:

  • vSphere ESXi 6 U2 as the number one, well-known and stable production grade Virtualisation Technology.
  • vCenter 6 U2 as the Virtualisation central management and operation tool.
  • vSphere Integrated Containers as the Enterprise Production Ready container¬†runtime for vSphere, allowing developers familiar with Docker to develop in containers and deploy them alongside traditional VM-based workloads on vSphere clusters. Download from here:¬†The vSphere Integrated Containers Engine
  • VMware Admiral as the¬†Container Management platform for deploying and managing container based applications. Provides a UI for developers and app teams to provision and manage containers, including retrieving stats and info about container instances. Cloud administrators will be able to manage container hosts and apply governance to its usage, including capacity quotas and approval workflows. Download from here:¬†Harbor
  • VMware Harbor as¬†an enterprise-class registry server that stores and distributes Docker images. Have a UI and¬†functionalities usually required by an enterprise, such as security, identity, replication, and management. Download from here:¬†Admiral

This is the diagram block for those components:

As you can see in the diagram above vSphere Integrated Containers is comprised of three main components, all of which are available as open source on github. With these three capabilities, vSphere Integrated Containers will enable VMware customers to deliver a production-ready container solution to their developers and app teams.

 

*to be continued in part 2.

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Running your First Cloud Native Applications using Docker Container in Mac

As previous post, I will elaborate about Cloud Native Applications. But before that, I will post some basic concepts about Docker as the Container technology for Cloud Native Applications approach.

Docker is an open platform for developing, shipping, and running applications. Docker enables you to separate your applications from your infrastructure so you can deliver software quickly. With Docker, you can manage your infrastructure in the same ways you manage your applications. By taking advantage of Docker’s methodologies for shipping, testing, and deploying code quickly, you can significantly reduce the delay between writing code and running it in production.

If you are still confused about description of Docker, Microservices, Cloud Native Applications technology means. You can read it in here: http://bicarait.com/2016/05/31/microservices-cloud-native-applications/ 

In this post, I will start with the basic on how to run your first application in Docker that will be provisioned in your Mac laptop. Then, I will do that also in vSphere Integrated Container and also VMware Photon Platform.


Let’s Start the first Chapter: INSTALLATION¬†

  1. Download your Docker Engine from this URL (stable version): Get Docker for Mac (stable)
  2. Actually there are two approach to run docker on your Mac. The 1st one is to utilise Docker for Mac (which we will do this), and the second one is to utilise Docker Toolbox. The difference is in Docker for Mac approach, we will utilise HyperKit as lightweight virtualisation technology to run the container. Docker Toolbox will utilise Virtualbox as the virtualisation technology.
  3. Actually you can run both Docker for Mac and Docker Toolbox approach at the same time in your MacOS, but there are several things that you need to do, such as create different environment (set and unset command). I will not elaborate that in this post.
  4. Assume that your machine is empty for Docker engine.Docker Tutorial
  5. Install and Run Docker. Double click Docker.img that you have downloaded earlier to start the installation.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-15-29-46
  6. Check Docker version that is now running on your Mac after the installation is completed.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-15-34-06
  7. Let’s start with your basic application. Let’s do nginx web server using docker.
  8. Check your http://localhost first to check the status.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-15-54-28
  9. Basically, docker will try to run the source of your application locally. But if docker can not find it, then it will search through the public repository (default configuration is docker hub).screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-15-55-21
  10. Check your http://localhost now to check the status.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-15-56-03
  11.  Check the status of the docker using  docker ps command. If you want to stop the web server, do docker stop webserver and start the web by docker start webserver
  12. If you want to stop and remove the container, use the command docker rm -f webserver. If you want to delete the local images do the command docker rmi nginx. But before that, you can list the local images using docker images.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-16-00-14
  13. If you want to use another docker repository other than https://hub.docker.com or do a file sharing from your Mac to your docker engine, you can also configure that in the Docker for Mac menu.screen-shot-2016-10-31-at-16-17-40

Let’s Continue with¬†the second¬†Chapter: BOARDING YOUR APPS¬†

For this example we will utilise Docker Compose to run WordPress in an isolated environment. Compose is a docker tool for running multi containers environment. We will create a compose file, and then execute the YAML file using docker-compose command.

  1. Create a directory for the project in your Mac.
  2. screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-18-51-10Create a docker compose file. This will include wordpress and mysql to create a simple blog website.screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-18-53-49
  3. Now, build the project using the command $ docker-compose up -d
  4. screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-18-56-35Check whether the images already installed and run. Using docker images and docker ps command.
  5. screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-19-02-49Finally, test to open the wordpress in your browser. Because we put the configuration in port 8000, then we will open http://localhost:8000
  6. Do the installations of wordpress using the UI wizard, then finally open the created site.screen-shot-2016-11-01-at-19-01-32

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

VMware Photon Platform or vSphere Integrated Container

Cloud Native Applications implementation using container technology is hardly to ignore if you want to keep up with this culture of agile and fast innovations. VMware have two approaches to support for this initiative. Either to use vSphere Integrated Container approach or VMware Photon Platform approach.

So, what are the differences? In Summary:

  • If you want to run both containerized and traditional workloads in production side by side on your existing infrastructure, VIC is the ideal choice. VIC extends all¬†the enterprise capabilities of vSphere without requiring additional investment in retooling or re-architecting your existing infrastructure.
  • If you are looking at building an on-prem, green field infrastructure stack for only running containerized workloads, and also would like a highly available and scalable control plane, an API-driven, automated DevOps environment, plus multi-tenancy for creation and isolation resources, Photon Platform is the way to go.

In this couple of weeks, I will elaborate more about this cloud native applications. Please wait for my next posts.

So, these are the plan:
1. Run Docker Apps in the laptop (for my case, I will use Mac)
We will utilise: Mac OS, Docker, Swarm.
2. Run Docker Apps in vSphere Integrated Container
We will utilise: VMware vSphere, vCenter, Photon OS, Harbor, Admiral.
3. Run Docker Apps in VMware Photon Platform
We will utilise: VMware vSphere, Photon Controller, Photon OS, Kubernetes

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Physical CPU (pCPU) and Virtual CPU (vCPU) Ratio in VMware vSphere ESXi Environment

I have some testings couple of times about this. In a Business Critical Applications, Telco Workloads Applications (Network Function Virtualisation (NFV)), or High CPU intensive applications (without high up and down intensity of CPU workloads), it is always recommended to do dimensioning of 1 vCPU compare to 1 pCPU. Regardless we have the performance benefit from Hyperthread technology around 25% because of the scheduling enhancement from intel processor.

For IT workloads (such as email, web apps, normal apps, etc) we can give better ratio such as 1 pCPU to 4 vCPU or even 1:10 or I also see some 1:20 of the production environments. Due to the VMs will not burst at the same time with a stable and long transactions per second.

These are some tests that I have for Network Function Virtualisation platform, we are pushing one of Telco workloads applications (messages) using Spirent as performance load tester to our VNF (telco VM) which run on the intel servers.

Known Fact for Host and VM during the Test:

  • Configuration of the Host¬†= 20 cores x 2.297 GHz = 45,940 MHz
  • Configuration of the VM¬†= 10 vCPU x 2.297 GHz = 22,297 MHz
  • Only 1 VM is powered on in the host (for testing purpose only to avoid¬†contention)

Observation of Host CPU performance:

  • Max Host during Test Performance (Hz)= 12,992 MHz of total 45,940 MHz
  • Max Host during Test Performance (%)= 28.27 % of total 45,940 MHz

Observation of VM CPU performance:

  • Max VM during Test Performance (Hz)= 12,367 MHz of total 22,297 MHz
  • Max VM during Test Performance (%)= 53.83 % of total 22,297 MHz

Conclusion:

  • Percentage calculation is the same result as MHz calculation. Means, if we calculate percentage usage with total MHz then the result will be MHz usage.
  • CPU clock speed that will be needed by¬†VNF vendor can be calculated based on MHz or percentage calculation, as long as the functionality is considered as apple to apple comparison (need to consider¬†the number of modules/functionality).
  • From performance wise observation, this will also give better view that for NFV workloads, 1 to 1 mapping dimensioning is reflected between vCPU and pCPU ‚ÄĒ> 10 vCPU is almost the same as 10 pCPU (from MHz calculations usage scenario).

Notes:
Physical CPU is physical cores that is resides in the servers. Virtual CPU is logical cores that is resides in the VMs (can benefit the hyper thread technology).

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Why Smaller vCPU is better than Bigger vCPU in a fully probable contention environment

In VMware vSphere environment, why Smaller vCPU is better than Bigger vCPU (if the workloads only require few vCPU) in a fully probable contention environment?

To explain this further let’s take an example of a four pCPU host that has four VMs, three with 1 vCPU and one with 4 vCPUs. At best only the three single vCPU VMs can be scheduled concurrently. In such an instance the 4 vCPU VM would have to wait for all four pCPUs to be idle. In this example the excess vCPUs actually impose scheduling constraints and consequently degrade the VM’s overall performance, typically indicated by low CPU utilization but a high CPU Ready figure.

So, always start with smaller vCPU and then add extra vCPU later on if needed based on your observation about the workload.

This reference post also share a very good description why too many vCPU will give poor performance to your Virtual Machine: http://www.gabesvirtualworld.com/how-too-many-vcpus-can-negatively-affect-your-performance/

Conclusion: “Right Size Your VMs!”

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

Why do we need to Virtualize our Oracle Database

Usually customer would like to expand the benefits that they already achieved using virtualization (financial, business and operational benefits of virtualization within its operating environment) to another level. For example to Business Critical Applications such as Oracle Database, thereby reaping the many benefits and advantages through its adoption of this infrastructure.

Customer aims to achieve the following benefits:

  • Effectively utilise datacenter resources, as in traditional physical servers a lot of database server only utilize 30% of the resources.
  • Maximise availability of the Oracle environment at lower cost, as virtualization can give another layer of high availability.
  • Rapidly deploy Oracle database servers for development, testing & production, as virtualization can have templates and automation.
  • Maximise uptime during planned maintenance, as virtualization can give the ability to move database to another machine without any downtime for the workload.
  • Minimise planned and unplanned downtime, as virtualization can give better disaster recovery avoidance and disaster recovery actions.
  • Automated testing and failover of Oracle datacenter environments for disaster recovery and business continuity.
  • Achieve IT Compliance, as we have better monitoring systems, audit mechanism, policy enforcement, and asset managements.
  • Minimise Oracle datacenter costs for floor space, energy, cooling, hardware and labour, as some physical servers can be consolidated into just several physical servers. This will give customer a better TCO/ROI compare to physical servers approach.

 

Kind Regards,
Doddi Priyambodo

 

 

Update sequence for vSphere 6.0 and its compatible VMware products

Following our technical discussion regarding upgrade VMware environments, actually I already wrote about this topic in different thread  in this blog. But, I would like to emphasise again by using another KB from VMware. VMware has made available certain releases to address critical issues and architectural changes for several products to allow for continued interoperability:

  • vCloud Connector (vCC)
  • vCloud Director (vCD)
  • vCloud Networking and Security (VCNS, formerly vShield Manager)
  • VMware Horizon View
  • VMware NSX for vSphere (NSX Manager)
  • vCenter Operations Manager (vCOPs)
  • vCenter Server / vCenter Server Appliance
  • vCenter Infrastructure Navigator (VIN)
  • vCenter Site Recovery Manager (SRM)
  • vCenter Update Manager (VUM)
  • vRealize Automation Center (vRA, formerly known as vCloud Automation Center)
  • vRealize Automation Application Services (vRAS, formerly vSphere AppDirector)
  • vRealize Business, IT Cost Management (ITBM, formerly VMware IT Business Management)
  • vRealize Configuration Manager (VCM, formerly vCenter Configuration Manager)
  • vRealize Hyperic
  • vRealize Log Insight (vRLI)
  • vRealize Operations Manager (vROPs, formerly known as vCenter Operations Manager, vCOPs)
  • vRealize Orchestrator (vRO, formerly vCenter Orchestrator)
  • vSphere Big Data Extension (BDE)
  • vSphere Data Protection (VDP)
  • vSphere Replication (VR)
  • vSphere ESXi
  • vShield Edge / NSX Edge
  • vShield App / NSX Logical Firewall (NSX LFw)
  • vShield Endpoint / NSX Guest Introspection and Data Security (NSX Guest IDS)
This article only encompasses environments running vSphere and/or vCloud Suite 6.0 and VMware products compatible with vSphere 6.0.

In an environment with vSphere 6.0 and its compatible VMware products, perform the update sequence described in the Supported Update Sequence table.

Supported Update Sequence

Continue reading Update sequence for vSphere 6.0 and its compatible VMware products